Escapements of chinook salmon in southeast Alaska and transboundary rivers in 1996
Read Online
Share

Escapements of chinook salmon in southeast Alaska and transboundary rivers in 1996 by Keith A. Pahlke

  • 270 Want to read
  • ·
  • 60 Currently reading

Published by Alaska Dept. of Fish and Game, Division of Sport Fish in Douglas, AK .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Chinook salmon -- Alaska, Southeastern -- Statistics.,
  • Salmon fisheries -- Alaska, Southeastern -- Statistics.,
  • Fish populations -- Alaska, Southeastern -- Statistics.

Book details:

About the Edition

As part of a continuing stock assessment program in Southeast Alaska, the Division of Sport Fish obtained indices of escapement for chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha in designated streams and transboundary rivers. The estimated total escapement in 1996 was 128,686 large (age .3+) chinook, a 65% increase from the 78,226 fish estimated in 1995. The 1996 estimate was over three times the 19751980 base period average of 40,949 chinook salmon, twice the 19811985 average of 63,580 and 149% of the 19861990 average of 86,474. The estimated total exceeded the goal for the region for the second time in 3 years, primarily due to a record high escapement to the Taku River. Escapement indices exceeded management goals in the Taku, Situk, Chilkat, Unuk and King Salmon Rivers and were near goals in the Stikine and Keta Rivers and Andrew Creek. The Alsek River escapement dropped below goal after exceeding it for the first time in 1995. Escapements to the Chickamin and Blossom Rivers improved slightly over 1995 but remained below goals.

Edition Notes

Statementby Keith A. Pahlke.
GenreStatistics.
SeriesFishery data series -- no. 97-33.
ContributionsAlaska. Division of Sport Fish.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsSH11 .A7542 no. 97-33
The Physical Object
Paginationiii, 46 p. :
Number of Pages46
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL15489624M

Download Escapements of chinook salmon in southeast Alaska and transboundary rivers in 1996

PDF EPUB FB2 MOBI RTF

   Estimates of total escapements of Chinook salmon to escapement indicator systems and to Southeast Alaska and transboundary rivers, – .. 56 Escapement goal performance for indicator coho salmon streams in Southeast Alaska (SEAK) and Southeast Alaska Chinook stocks considered in PSC management are the Situk, Alsek, Chilkat, Taku, Stikine, Unuk, and Chickamin three of which are also managed for in-stream harvests by the Transboundary Panel. Chinook escapements to all seven of these rivers were below lower level escapement goals in and    Annual Southeast Alaska commercial and recreational Chinook salmon harvests and Alaska hatchery contribution, in thousands of fish, – .. 38 Southeast Alaska winter troll fishery Chinook salmon harvest, vessel landings, catch per landing, and   Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha re­ turning to the Taku River represent 1 of the largest and most important populations of chinook salmon in Southeast Alaska (Figure 1). Prior to the mid s these fish were exploited in directed commercial fish­ eries in Alaska, annual harvests reach fish (Kissner )

  Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha re-turning to the Taku River represent 1 of the largest and most important populations of chinook salmon in Southeast Alaska (Figure 1). Prior to the mid s these fish were exploited in directed commercial fish-eries in Alaska, annual harvests reach fish (Kissner ).   •34 Chinook salmon systems in Southeast Alaska • 11 indicator stocks (>90% of wild production) • ~, wild “large” Chinook/year • Large fish (≥ mm MEF or 28”) - mostly 3 and 4 ocean, ♀ • Biological escapement goals for all 11 indicator stocks • Taku and Stikine rivers >80% wild production (Chilkat 4%) • Stock specific marine rearing patterns: inside and outside Stock Compositions of Sockeye Salmon Catches in Southeast Alaska District and Gillnet Fisheries, , Estimated with Scale Pattern Analysis. Escapement Goals for Chinook Salmon in the Alsek, Taku, and Stikine Rivers. Date added: October Salmon Catches and Escapements to the Transboundary Rivers in Date added /technical-reports/technical-committee-reports/transboundary.   Chinook Salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha return to the Yukon River in northwestern North America each summer, migrating to spawning destinations from the lower river to more than 3, km upstream from the Bering Sea (Evenson et al. ; Eiler et al. ).These returns are comprised of stream-type fish with most individuals rearing in freshwater for a year before migrating to sea (Healey

PACIFIC SALMON: THE CANADA-UNITED STATES DISPUTE. BIOLOGICAL CONTEXT. The five species of Pacific salmon (along with steelhead trout) differ in terms of their life cycle, size, productivity, dependence on freshwater habitat, behaviour and susceptibility to fishing gear. Flesh colour, oil content and flesh texture are other distinguishing characteristics. Some species are preferred Robert D. Mecum has written: 'Escapements of chinook salmon in southeast Alaska and transboundary rivers in ' -- subject(s): Salmon fisheries, Chinook salmon, Fish populations Load More Observations on externally scarred and marred Chinook and coho salmon in the southeast Alaska commercial troll fishery: M. Seibel, A. Davis, J. Kelly, L. Talley and P. Skannes: Alaska Department of Fish and Game: March, English: INPFC: Report of the ad hoc salmon research coordinating group— Ad Hoc Salmon Research   In southeast Alaska, it is our understanding that little progress has been made since in addressing the lack of quantitative salmon stock assessment data noted by Baker et al. () and by Wertheimer (), except in transboundary rivers covered by the Pacific Salmon Treaty. Although salmon response Alaska hatchery